100,000 dead

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We did everything we could

We did everything we could

We did everything we could

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We did everything we could

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We did everything we could

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We did everything we could

We did everything we could

'Go back 
to work or 
risk losing 
Ministers warn home working could make 
staff 'vulnerable' as nation returns to offices 
Cloc nail! Cclcgrapb 
iiiii Uliiii 
By Gordon Rayner, Camilla Tominey 
and Charles Hymas 
BORIS JOHNSON will launch a major 
drive to get Britain back to the office as 
ministers warn that working from 
home will make people more "vulnep 
able" to being sacked. 
A publicity campaign to begin next 
week Will extol the virtues Of returning 
to the workplace, making the "emo- 
tional case" for mixing with colleagues 
and highlighting the benefits to mental 
health. 
It will also provide reassurance that 
"the workplace is a safe place", while a 
new online tool will help people avoid 
the most crowded trains and buses. 
While the media blitz, to be launched 
at the end of next week once schools in 
England have reopened, will focus on 
thc positives of returning to thc office, 
ministers are already warning Of the 
negatives Of home working as part Of a 
carrot and stick approach. 
They have sent out the message that 
bosses at struggling firms will find it 
easier to hand out PGs to people they 
never see than to those who have been 
at their desks during the pandemic. 
The Prime Minister is said to be 
increasingly concerned about empty 
offices and eerily quiet city centres as 
millions refuse to hecd his calls for 
them to return. Rishi Sunak, the Chan- 
cellor, is also worried about further job 
losses in businesses that depend on Of- 
fice workers for their trade, such as 
sandwich shops, gyms and pubs, as 
well as the financial cost of running 
near-empty trains and buses. 
Pret a Manger, the sandwich chain, 
announced last night it was cutting 
2,800 jobs as part of a major restructur% 
ing caused by the pandemic. 
One government source said: "Peo- 
plc need to understand that working 
from home is not the benign option it 
We need workers 
be alert t 
what decisions their bosses may take in 
the weeks ahead. If they are only see- 
ing workers once a fortnight then that 
could prove problematic for some em• 
ployees in the future. 
"We want employees to be careful 
what working arrangements they ac- 
ccpt. Suddcnly the word •restructure' is 
bandied about and people Who have 
been working from home find them- 
selves in the most vulnerable position." 
Some of the country's biggest com- 
panics have told employees they do not 
need to return to their workplaces un• 
til next year, with far reaching conse- 
quences for city centre economies. 
Civil Service bosses have also defied 
ministers by ignoring their demands to 
get Whitehall workers back en masse. 
Onc Cabinet minister said: "Clearly 
people should be going back to work 
because it is safe to do so. There al- 
Ivady problems With workers' mental 
health. people need company espe- 
cially those living on their own or with 
a limited support network. 
ahere will be some economic con- 
sequences of shutdown. Companies 
will realise some people weren't work- 
ing as hard as they thought There is 
going to be a review of how productive 
people are." 
Another minister said: "Once the 
schools go back we will be switching 
our attention to gctting people back to 
their workplaces. It Will be a call to 
arms to the nation." 
At the Start of lockdown, newspapers 
were enlisted to publish front page ad- 
verts with the Stay At Home message. A 
similar tactic is expected to be used 
next month to reverse that mesage by 
telling people to leave their homes. 
A government source said: "There 
will be three main messages: showing* 
Continued on page 4 
Fraser Nelson: Page 14 
Paris makes masks mandatory 
inn , 
A woman wearing a face covering cycles near the Eiffel Tower as Paris today makes masks compulsory in all outdoor spaces. It came 
as France recorded a DOSt-Iockd0wn record Of more than 6.100 new virus in 
ions in iust 24 hours and 
Rrat rose to IA. 
Last-minute 
legal onslaught 
halts migrant 
deportations 
ny Charles Hymas 
HOME AFFAIRS EDITOR 
PRITI PATEL was forced to abandon a 
deportation flight returning illegal 
Channel migrants to Spain yesterday 
after human rights lawyers mounted 
last-minute legal actions. 
Sources said the Home OfT1ce was hit 
by so many eleventh-hour claims that it 
had no option but to cancel the flight, 
which would have returned 23 illegal 
migrants who arrived in the UK on 
small boats from France. 
It came as the Ilome Office was 
embroiled in a row with lawyers over a 
video it posted on attempts to remove 
migrants in which it said current Ivgu- 
lations were "allowing activist lawyers 
to delay and disrupt returns". 
The Home Secretary is planning to 
overhaul asylum laws which she has re- 
portedly claimed are being "exploited 
by Leftie Labour-supporting lawyers" 
trying to stop the Government remov 
mgpeople 
She is working on a "fair bordeß 
Bill," to be introduced this year, which 
would stop people drawing out the 
lum application process by making 
them declare all their gmunds ror refu- 
gee status When they apply, rather than 
being able to submit new reasons later. 
She is understood to be "furious" at 
legal attempts to Stop Brit- 
ain clamping down on migrants CIOSS- 
ing the Channel by ensuring they are 
returned to the Etj country in which 
'We have lots more 
[deportaüonslplanned over 
coming weeks and months. 
It is not going to deter us' 
they first arrived and where they 
should have applied ror asylum. 
A Whitehall source said: "The1V was 
100 per cent legal attrition rate on the 
flight due to unprecedented and organ- 
ised casework barriers sprung on the 
Government by law firms. We have lots 
more planned over coming weeks and 
months. It is not going to deter us." 
Under the Dublin Agreement, EU 
countries accept back migrants if it can 
be shown it was their first EU port of 
entry and so they should have applied 
for asylum there. Madrid had agreed to 
takc back the migrants, who passed 
through Spain on their way to Britain. 
The illegal migrants' lawyers were, 
however, able to "bog the process 
down in legal quagmile", accoming to 
the Whitehall insider. It is thought they 
would have claimed breaches under 
the European Convention on Iluman 
Rights including their rights to a family 
life or that they risked persecution if 
they were denied asylum. 
Lawyers also increasingly use mod- 
ern slavery legislation to claim mi- 
grants are victims of trafficking who 
Contin u ed

We did everything we could

We did everything we could

We did everything we could

We did everything we could

We did everything we could

We did everything we could

We did everything we could

We did everything we could


Well Al (exander Boris dePfeffle Johnson) Ass, I really don’t think you did, you hopeless lying bastard.


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